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Post-Surgical Instructions

Our team at Edison Lakes Oral Surgery is dedicated to not only providing unparalleled service to our patients while they are in our office, but also following their procedure(s). Please click on the appropriate link below that corresponds to the care you received. As always, if you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us directly at 574.272.8823.

After Tooth/Teeth Removal

Day of Surgery
  1. Bite on gauze steadily for one hour then replace it with lightly moistened gauze every hour until the bleeding stops.  The gauze pad should be rolled tightly and placed directly on the extraction socket with pressure applied steadily.  Bleeding usually stops in 3-4 hours.  It is normal for the socket to ooze on and off for several days. 
  2. Medications: Take any and all medications as directed.

  3. Pain: The most common complaint after having teeth removed is that the surgical site is painful for several days after surgery.  Although we cannot guarantee you will be pain free after surgery, steps can be taken to improve the level of pain control.  You may be given a prescription for a narcotic medication.  We recommend you also begin a regimen of ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) unless your doctor advises otherwise.  Ibuprofen is an over-the-counter medication that you can obtain at the pharmacy without a prescription.  It is dispensed as 200mg tablets.  As soon as you can eat after surgery, take 2-3 tablets of ibuprofen.  Continue taking 2-3 tablets every 6-8 hours after surgery until pain subsides.  Take the prescription medication if you have pain that the ibuprofen is not handling.  It is important to stay “ahead” of the pain, so take medications early on in the pain course rather than waiting until it is severe.  You can take up to 2 tablets of the narcotic medication every 4 hours if needed.  Please call if you have any concerns.

  4. Try not to lie down flat today.  Lying down will lead to more swelling, bleeding and pain.  We recommend that you either sleep in a chair with your head elevated or propped up with several pillows in bed.  The general rule is that if you had pain during the day, sleep with your head elevated that night. 

  5. Eat a soft diet such as ice cream, yogurt, pudding, pasta, eggs, etc. until the local anesthesia wears off.  Keep drinking fluids throughout your recovery.  Hydration is critical for proper healing.
  6. Ice: For the first 24 hours after surgery, place ice on the side(s) of your face where the tooth (teeth) was removed.  This can decrease pain and swelling.  We recommend placing ice on your face for 20 minutes then taking it off for 10 minutes.  After 24 hours, the ice should be discontinued and heat may be placed on your face if desired.  Use a rice pack or moist heat if possible.  Continue heat until the swelling has gone away. 

Day After Surgery

  1. The next morning it is important to get up and start relieving the swelling that occurred overnight.  Brush your teeth very gently near the extraction sites and normally everywhere else.  You may find warm water will make the bristles softer and more comfortable in the extraction areas.  Rinse gently to rinse out the toothpaste.  Warm salt water rinses should begin 24-48 hours after surgery.  Do not use commercial mouth rinses such as Listerine, Scope, or hydrogen peroxide.  These solutions can delay healing.
  2. Eat soft, solid, high calorie food the day after surgery if you are comfortable chewing.  Take small bites and chew in an area away from the extraction sites.  Good nutrition promotes healing.
  3. Walk around doing light activity to help decrease the swelling. This will also promote better breathing.
  4. If you have stitches, they will dissolve on their own, and you do not need to come back to the office if you think you are doing well
  5. If you have moderate to severe pain that is persistent or increasing after 5-7 days from surgery, or if you have any questions, please call our office.

Specific Concerns
  1. Discomfort: The narcotic pain pills prescribed for you will help decrease this pain, but may not totally eliminate it.  Narcotic pain medications may upset your stomach.  This side effect can be lessened if you eat something substantial before taking the medication.  Pain may be managed with ibuprofen or similar over-the-counter medication.  Stay “ahead” of your pain by taking your pain medication when the pain is mild rather than waiting until it is severe.  Smoking will greatly increase your pain.

  2. Bleeding: Some oozing is to be expected after oral surgery.  Biting on gauze with firm, steady pressure for 1 hour after surgery will usually be enough to stop continuous bleeding.  If brisk bleeding continues, place a fresh, cold, tightly-rolled, dampened gauze pad directly over the bleeding area and bite firmly and continuously for another 60 minutes.  If bleeding persists, biting on a moistened tea bag wrapped in gauze may stop the bleeding.

  3. Swelling: Some swelling is normal following oral surgery.  Putting an ice bag intermittently on the face on the day of surgery limits this swelling and makes it feel better.  Ice used after 24 hours from surgery will generally increase your pain.  Beginning the day after surgery, moist heat to the face may help reduce swelling and soreness. 

  4. Diet: High fluid intake is essential.  Your urine should be clear and frequent (every 2-4 hours).  Eat nourishing, soft, high calorie foods such as cottage cheese, creamy soups, milk shakes, ice cream, pudding, yogurt, egg salad, tuna fish, or pasta.

  5. Rinsing: Do not vigerously rinse your mouth until at least the day after surgery. Beginning the following morning, you should brush your teeth and rinse gently with tap water to remove the toothpaste. Beginning no earlier than 24 hours after surgery, rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day. Salt water solution is made by adding only a few dashes of salt to a glass of warm water.
Don’t…
  • Don’t suck through a straw for 3-5 days.
  • Don’t rinse with commercial mouth washes or hydrogen peroxide for at least 1 week.
  • Don’t do strenuous exercises for 5-7 days.
  • Don’t smoke for at least 7 days after surgery and longer if you are having any postoperative pain.
If, after your procedure, you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at 574.272.8823.

After Extraction of Wisdom Teeth

Day of Surgery
  1. Bite on gauze steadily for one hour then replace it with lightly moistened gauze every hour until the bleeding stops.  The gauze pad should be rolled tightly and placed directly on the extraction socket and pressure applied steadily.  Bleeding usually stops in 3-4 hours.  It is normal for the socket to ooze on and off from several days.  If bleeding persists more than 4 hours, bite on a moistened tea bag.

  2. Medications: If you were given antibiotics, start taking them once you know you are not having nausea from the surgery or pain pills and you have had a chance to eat something.

  3. Pain: the most common complaint after having teeth removed is that the surgical site is painful for several days after surgery.  Although we cannot guarantee you will be pain free after surgery, steps can be taken to improve the level of pain control.  The pain is typically most dramatic 3-5 days after surgery.  It is normal to need to take pain medication for 5-7 days after a tooth is removed (or even longer for difficult teeth or if you are older).  You will be given a prescription for a narcotic medication.  We recommend you also begin a regimen of ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin) unless your doctor advises you against this.  You can get this at the pharmacy without a prescription.  It comes as 200mg tablets.  As soon as you can eat after surgery, take 2-3 tablets of ibuprofen.  Continue taking 2-3 tablets every 6-8 hours for 5-7 days after surgery.  As soon as you feel the local anesthesia wearing off (tingling in your lip), take one tablet of the narcotic pain medication that we wrote a prescription for.  After that, take the prescription medication if you have pain that the ibuprofen is not handling.  It is important to stay “ahead” of the pain, so take medications early in the pain course rather than waiting until it is severe.  You can take up to 2 tablets of the narcotic medication every 4 hours if needed.  Please call if you have any concerns.

  4. Try not to lie down flat today.  If you need to nap, do it sitting up in a chair or recliner.  Lying down will lead to more swelling, bleeding, and pain.  We recommend you either sleep in a chair with your head up or propped up with several pillows in bed.  The general rule is that if you had pain during the day, sleep with your head elevated that night. 

  5. Eat a soft diet such as ice cream, yogurt, pudding, pasta, eggs, etc. until the local anesthesia wears off.  Keep drinking fluids throughout your recovery.  Hydration is critical for proper healing.

  6. Ice: For the first 24 hours after surgery, place ice on the side(s) of your face that had the tooth (teeth) removed.  This can decrease pain and swelling.  We recommend placing ice on your face for 20 minutes then taking it off for 10 minutes.  After 24 hours, the ice should be discontinued and heat may be placed on your face if desired.  Use a rice pack or moist heat if possible.  Continue heat until the swelling has gone away.  This may take 4-7 days.
Day After Surgery
  1. The next morning it is important to get up and start relieving the selling that occurred overnight.  Start with a shower and shampoo and then lightly stretch your mouth with your fingers if it is stiff.  Brush your teeth very gently near the extraction sites and normally everywhere else.  You may find warm water will make the bristles softer and more comfortable in the extraction areas.  Rinse gently to rinse out the toothpaste.  Warm salt water rinses should begin 24-48 hours after surgery.  Do not use commercial mouth rinses such as Listerine, Scope, or hydrogen peroxide.  These solutions can delay healing.
  2. Eat soft, solid, high calorie food the day after surgery if you are comfortable chewing.  Take small bites and chew in an area away from the extraction sites.  Good nutrition promotes healing.
  3. Walk around doing light activity to help decrease the swelling.  This will also promote better breathing.
  4. If you have stitches, they will dissolve on their own, and you do not have to come back to the office if you think you are doing well.
  5. If you have moderate to severe pain that is persisting or increasing after 5-7 days from surgery or if you have any questions, please call our office.

Instructions for Specific Concerns
  1. Discomfort: Postoperative pain is most severe 3-5 days after surgery.  The narcotic pain pills prescribed for you will help decrease this pain but may not totally eliminate it.  Narcotic pain medications may upset your stomach.  This side effect can be lessened if you eat something substantial before taking the medication.  Pain usually decreases beginning on day 5 or so and may be managed with ibuprofen or similar over-the-counter medication.  Stay “ahead” of your pain by taking your pain medication when the pain is mild rather than waiting until it is severe.  Smoking will greatly increase your pain.

  2. Bleeding: Some oozing is to be expected after oral surgery.  Biting on gauze with firm, steady pressure for 1 hour after surgery will usually be enough to stop continuous bleeding.  If brisk bleeding continues, place a fresh, cold, tightly-rolled, dampened gauze pad directly over the bleeding area and bite firmly and continuously for another 60 minutes.  If bleeding persists, biting on a moistened tea bag wrapped in gauze may stop the bleeding.

  3. Swelling: Some swelling is normal following oral surgery.  Maximum swelling is usually 4-5 days after surgery.  Putting an ice bag intermittently on the face on the day of surgery limits this swelling and makes it feel better.  Ice used after 24 hours from surgery will generally increase your pain.  Beginning the day after surgery, moist heat to the face may help reduce swelling and soreness.  An elevated body temperature may occur during the first two days after surgery.

  4. Stiffness: It is common for the jaw muscles to stiffen up by the morning after surgery.  This should be overcome with gentle finger pressure between the front teeth the first morning after surgery.  If you wait for 2-3 days to stretch the mouth open it is generally more difficult and painful to do.

  5. Diet: High fluid intake is essential.  Your urine should be clear and frequent (every 2-4 hours).  Eat nourishing, soft, high calorie foods such as cottage cheese, creamy soups, milk shakes, ice cream, pudding, yogurt, egg salad, tuna fish, or pasta.

  6. Rinsing: Do not vigorously rinse your mouth until at least the day after surgery.  Beginning the following morning, you should brush your teeth and rinse gently with tap water to remove the toothpaste.  Beginning no earlier than 24 hours after surgery, rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day.  Salt water solution is made by adding only a few dashes of salt to a glass of warm water.


Don’t…
  1. Don’t suck through a straw for 3-5 days.
  2. Don’t rinse with commercial mouth washes or hydrogen peroxide for at least 1 week.
  3. Don’t do strenuous exercises for 5-7 days
  4. Don’t smoke for at least 7 days after surgery and longer if you are having any postoperative pain.

If, after your procedure, you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at 574.272.8823.

After Exposure & Bracketing of Impacted Teeth

After exposure of an impacted tooth do not disturb the wound.  If surgical packing was placed, leave it alone.  The pack helps to keep the tooth exposed.  If it gets dislodged or falls out do not get alarmed; contact our office the next business day.  If there are sharp wires or brackets that bother you small amount of orthodontic wax may be applied.

Bleeding:  Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24-48 hours.  Excessive bleeding which results in your mouth filling rapidly with blood can frequently be controlled by biting with pressure on a damp gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes.  If bleeding continues please call for further instructions.
Swelling:  Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery.  To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag or a plastic bag or towel filled with ice cubes on the face in the area of surgery.  Apply the ice continuously as much as possible for the first 24 hours.
Diet:  Drink plenty of fluids.  Avoid hot liquids or food.  Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery.  Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.
Pain:  You should begin taking the prescribed pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off.  For moderate pain take whatever over the counter analgesic you take for headaches etc.  Ibuprofen bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: 2-3 tablets may be taken every 6-8 hours as needed for pain.  For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed.
Oral Hygiene:  Cleanliness is essential to good healing.  Clean your mouth thoroughly after each meal beginning the day after surgery.  Brush your teeth as best you can using warm water and use softer bristles to make it more comfortable.  Rinse with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) six times a day.  Continue this procedure until healing is complete.
If, after your procedure, you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at 574.272.8823.​

After Bone Graft

After a bone graft procedure: Do not disturb the wound. Avoid vigorous rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery. There may be multiple sutures present at the surgical site. Do not attempt to remove or alter the sutures. If sutures become dislodged, or if you feel strange contours of the surgical site do not panic and call our office for instructions.

Bleeding:  Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24-48 hours. Excessive should not occur, but can be controlled by biting on a damp gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues please call for further instructions.

Swelling:  Mild to moderate amount of swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag, or a plastic bag, or towel filled with ice on the cheek in the area of surgery. Apply the ice as much as possible for the first 24 hours.
Diet: Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or food. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.
Pain:  You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off. For moderate pain, Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) may be taken. Ibuprofen, bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: 2-3 tablets may be taken every 3-4 hours as needed for pain. For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed. Do not take any of the above medication if you are allergic, or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it.
Antibiotics:  If you’re are given antibiotics, be sure to take the prescribed medications as directed to help prevent infection. If you are not given post-operative antibiotics, it is most likely because one was not required or you were given the appropriate intravenous dose during your procedure.
Oral Hygiene:  Good oral hygiene is essential to good healing. The night of surgery, use the prescribed Peridex Oral Rinse before bed. The day after surgery, the Peridex should be used two times daily, after breakfast and before bed. Be sure to rinse for at least 30 seconds then spit it out. Warm salt-water rinses (teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) should be used at least 4-5 times a day, as well, especially after meals.
Activity:  Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery. If you are considering exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur. If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising. Keep in mind that you are probably not taking normal nourishment. This may weaken you and further limit your ability to exercise.
Wearing your Prosthesis:  In some cases partial dentures, Provisionals, or full dentures may not be used immediately after surgery and for at least 10 days. Make sure to receive instruction regarding your temporary appliance from your surgeon following your procedure. If you are unclear of what to do regarding your prosthesis, please call our office.
Sinus Bone Graft:  If you have had a sinus bone graft please note the following additional comments:
intermittent bleeding from nose is common.  You may experience sinus congestion for as much as 1 week.  Do not blow your nose or otherwise create blowing or sucking motion for at least one week following your procedure. These actions would prevent normal healing.  If you have to sneeze, do it with your mouth and nose open.  If you are given medications such as decongestants or antibiotics, take them as directed.
If, after your procedure, you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at 574.272.8823.

After A Sinus Lift

For your extraction sites to heal well, it is very important that you protect and “baby” the area.  It is also extremely important that you do not do anything that develops pressure within your sinuses. 
BE CAREFUL TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS
  • DO NOT blow your nose. If your nose gets runny, dab it with tissue.
  • DO NOT cough or sneeze with your mouth closed.If you must cough or sneeze, open your mouth and let the pressure escape through your mouth.You can cover your mouth with a handkerchief or tissue. DO NOT try to hold it in.
  • ABSOLUTELY NO SMOKING, at all. NOT EVEN A PUFF!
  • DO NOT rub on the gums in this area. Keep your toothbrush away.
  • DO NOT eat hard or crunchy foods (potato chips, pretzels, toast, crusty bread, dry cereal, pizza, etc.). Stick to soft foods and eat on the other side of your mouth.
  • DO NOT rinse your mouth for 72 hours. Let the scab in the extraction site become firmly attached. After 72 hours, you may rinse gently with warm water (or warm salt water) only.
  • DO NOT use mouth rinses or mouthwash.

Take your medications as prescribed.  This will usually include the following:
  • Antibiotic (Augmentin, Amoxicillin, or Clindamycin) – use as directed by your doctor.
  • Decongestants/Antihistamines – use 3 to 4 times per day, if needed, for 2 weeks to prevent sinus congestion and stuffiness.
  • Decongestant nasal spray – if needed, to prevent nasal stuffiness (Afrin for a maximum of 3 days).

It is VERY important to strictly follow these precautions for your extraction sites to heal without complications.

After Implant Placement

After placement of dental implants, do not disturb the wound.  Avoid rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery.  There may be metal healing abutments protruding through the gingival (gum) tissue.  In some cases, the abutment will not be visible immediately following surgery.

Bleeding:  Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours.  Excessive bleeding should not occur, but can be controlled by biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes.  If bleeding continues please call for further instructions.
Swelling:  Very mild swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery.  To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag, or a plastic bag, or towel filled with ice on the cheek in the area of surgery.  Apply the ice for the first 24 hours.
Diet:  Drink plenty of fluids.  Avoid hot liquids or food.  Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery.  Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.
Pain:  You should begin taking pain medication as soon as you feel the local anesthetic wearing off.  For moderate pain, Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) may be taken.  Ibuprofen, bought over the counter comes in 200 mg tablets: 2-3 tablets may be taken every 3-4 hours as needed for pain.  For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed.  Do not take any of the above medication if you are allergic, or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it.
Antibiotics:  Be sure to take the prescribed antibiotics as directed to help prevent infection.
Oral Hygiene:  Good oral hygiene is essential to good healing.  The day after surgery, Peridex should be used two times daily, after breakfast and before bed.  Be sure to rinse for at least 30 seconds then spit it out.  Warm salt-water rinses (teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) should be used at least 4-5 times a day, as well, especially after meals.  Use a cotton swab (Q-Tip) moistened with Peridex to gently clean the healing abutments three times a day.  If at any time you notice any looseness or mobility of the abutments please call our office for instructions.
Adjunct Procedures:  If you have had adjunctive procedure performed along with your implant surgery such as Bone or Soft Tissue Grafts please see the appropriate section for instructions.
Activity:  Keep physical activities to a minimum immediately following surgery.  If you are considering exercise, throbbing or bleeding may occur.  If this occurs, you should discontinue exercising.  Keep in mind that you are probably not taking normal nourishment.  This may weaken you and further limit your ability to exercise.
Wearing your Prosthesis:  Partial dentures, Provisionals, or full dentures may not be used immediately after surgery and for at least 10 days.  Make sure to receive instruction regarding your temporary appliance from your surgeon following your procedure.
If, after your procedure, you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at 574.272.8823.